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are packing up and getting ready to move. u.n. spokespersons say about half of their foreign employees will leave the country. >> they have assessed the situation and decided to reduce the presence of international staff in damascus due to conditions. >> motor shells landed near a hotel housing u.n. staff damaging the building and a u.n. vehicle. he says about half of 100 foreign staff members will move to lebanon or egypt. as those employees pull out the secretary general is sending team to investigate allegations by syrian forces. they say they used chemical weapons near the northern city of aleppo. he hopes the team will not consistent only of u.s. and european investigators. >>> rebel forces are now in control of the african capital. both sides signed a cease-fire? january. the rebels broke the agreement last week when they entered the capital. they took control of the city. their leader named himself interim president. they have announcdenounced the for breaking the cease-fire. the u.n. secretary general is calling for the rule of law to return as soon as possible. he says he's de
't want to make it worse. the u.n. has said, the u.s. secretary joe has said the introduction o of more weapons industry is adequate counterproductive or not will lead to a resolution for special representative brahimi called for renewed diplomatic initiative bring the warring party to negotiating table. can the prime minister set out what steps you a cake government is taking to support the u.n. and advancing this initiative? >> we are taking specific steps to help the u.n. with his initiative and try to achieve a diplomatic solution would transition at the top of the regime is worthwhile pursuing. that is why we have detailed talks with the russian foreign and defense ministers in the last week. i would just make one of the point about the issue of the arms embargo, because i felt sitting about the european council chamber there was a slight similarity between some of the arguments that were being made about not putting more weapons into syria that seem to be very familiar to the discussions we had about bosnia and the appalling events that followed. and in my view it is better to be
at least he's not going to go to the u.n.-- which he's now entitled to, whether it's the international criminal court or other agencies-- and keep pushing this unilateral recognition agenda. so nobody who's made that connection publicly or even privately to us but that is the kind of thing that's being looked at and i think quietly encouraged but then what the president kept saying today is pretty quickly when the talks start it can't be around these peripheral issues. it's got to be about security and borders. and once you settle those, the other issues go away like settlements. borders issue will settle the settlements issue. >> brown: very briefly margaret. even today while the president is there you have rockets coming in from gaza. is that seen as having any immediate impact or is that just more a sense of difficult these are very much still out there. >> i think it's the latter, jeff. if you had big demonstrations from the west bank that would be different but in fact it helps the president prove his point which is that the palestinian authority in the west bank has been doing a
at the speed of hertz. >>> welcome back to "around the world." this week 193 countries at the u.n. will consider a global treaty to limit the trade of everything from ak-47 assault rifles to hand grenades. >> the u.n. says small arms are flowing way too easily across borders and landing in the hands of gangs, rebels, pirates and terrorists. >> the u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon says the weapons are fueling armed conflicts, crime and violations of human rights. >> no kidding. a rare public appearance today from britain's queen elizabeth who's been a bit unwell lately accompanied by her husband prince phillip and katharine. >> they are celebrating 150th anniversary and earlier this month the 86-year-old monarch was admitted to the hospital with a stomach bug. and since her release the palace has limited her schedule. >> good to see her out and about though. >>> now check this out. it's a bowl that was sold for $2.2 million at an auction in new york on tuesday. >> wow. it's a rare piece from china that's about 1,000 years old. oh, my goodness. it looks very delicate. the previous
between 1980-1988 with the iranians. a regime that invaded kuwait after which u.n. sanctions really put an additional strain on iraqi society, while at the same time strengthening the criminalize networked associate with saddam that really control the country and the police state there. the associated polarizing effect on iraq's communities, how they have become pitted against each other, how the regime had used weapons of mass destruction on his own people, the kurds in the north, and how he had persecuted the majority of the population, the shia population in the wake oof the 1991-92 gulf war. and so, and also other factors associated with his return to face initiatives and the use of really so lofty jihadi ideologies to return peoples frustrations away from his regime and towards the west and israel and so forth. in the context of his conspiracy. the effect that had on iraqi society. so understanding that human dimension of conflict and in particular understanding local conflicts that could occur, how these tribal ethnic, sectarian competition for power and resources to play out. and
't true and they sent out surrogates like our u.n. ambassador susan rice to parrott falsehoods. so this is a continuing conspiracy on the american people to hide these people and now they feel intimidated, the very heros who helped save lives and their lives were in danger and they're injured and they fear their government? and this is an absolute outrage and i believe the senator's allegations not only are true, but i think he's the type of person who can get to the bottom of it and let the people speak to make sure they understand fully what happened. >> they'll try. our own jenna lee interviewed jay carney on friday and asked him whether the white house prevented or attempt to go prevent any of the folks from speaking. here is mr. carney's response. >> and first of all, i have no knowledge of this story, secondly, i'm sure that the white house is not preventing anyone from speaking. >> so we have him saying, i'm not familiar with the story and i'm sure we're not and lindsey graham saying i have spoken with some of the survivors and telling you that they, as they put it, have bee
, of course, continue to update our friends in the focus being made. >> the u.n. has said tens of thousands of civilians were killed in the final months of the war. the conflict lasted more than 20 years and ended in 2009. >>> japanese government officials are moving ahead with plans to relocate a military base. they formally complied for permission to begin reclamation for the land. >> we obtained consent from local fishermen this afternoon. so we immediately submitted our application. >> japanese and u.s. officials agree to move the air station from a densely populated area to a coastal area. the plan has been stalled because of opposition. the local majors want the base moved out of the prespefecture completely. >> it's virtually impossible. i told local officials they better change their plan and move it outside of okinawa. my view remains unchanged. >> they will decide in the next eight months to whether to approve the application. prime minister shinzo abe promised president barack obama last month he would see to the quick relocation. here are the latest market figures. >>> a group o
ever been. in term of global poverty the only u.n. goal is having more than having by 2015. and the middle class, and this is a really stunning news, if you look at where asia is today, they are 500 million people living in middle-class living standards today in 2013 in asia. by 2020, which is seven years in now, the number will explode from 500 million to 1.75 billion. an increase of 3.5 times in seven years. we've never seen this before in human history. that's going to change the chemistry of the world and create more positive glow around the world. >> so you will go from 500 million to 1.75 billion people in the asian middle class. so this asian middle class will now, in a sense, dominate the world economically, politically, culturally. >> in terms of economics, if you run any kind of major corporation, anywhere in the world and looking for markets and this is what ceos tell me from time to time that they do all of their projections and the future markets are in asia and inevidentably it is one of the largest markets for cultural products. the political theory, the one
? guest: i spent five years in iraq as the u.n. spokesman, i got to know it intimately. let me tell you that iraq is a pretty much destroyed country. in many ways.d physically and otherwise. there is no reconciliation. war in iraq weof find that the country is more divided than ever. as we have seen from john they's visit today, tensions between the united , nots and this government very cordial. imbued with a lot of tension. a lot coming back from the community of nations they have not really a implemented. that it is all because of a constitution that failed the entire public at large. basically taking segments of society and addressing themselves to them. host: this unannounced trip that you just indicated in iraq, these officials with the president on his trip, the associated press pointed out that there were a series of .eetings over flights iran says that this is humanitarian aid and that syria is getting the weapons or else. concern, as the israelis feel that regardless of everything going on, they look to the north and in syria they see it disintegrating. weapons are flowing int
to be here at cooper union and i am delighted of the sponsorship of n.y.u. which i am very familiar with so i feel at home for a lot of reasons and i appreciate the fact you braved the weather and the elements for three yesterday was so beautiful. what happened today? this is new york but it can change so dramatically and so quickly. i feel very at home because i have an early experience of learning about human rights. very early. growing up in the west of ireland wedged between two brothers and older and two brothers younger i had to be interested in equality and human rights but using my elbows to assert myself but as i try to explain in the book but that was not the norm but growing up in ireland where girls and women knew their place in the home or as a 90 or possibly to become a writer or a artist or a musician. i was very aware this you seem to have much more options even though my parent's repeated i had the same opportunities that my brothers had and they would support me in that. of the six years of the boarding school in dublin, i realize the options were not very exciting. most of
, if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, down the route of international organizations, that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. so let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i didn't mention on the israeli side -- i said there was a cop -- convergence on syria. there will be a discussion. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position, and it's hard to imagine, even if it's not a much of a public dimension, it's hard to imagine that's not going to be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but also a focus on this, and what if anything we in the international community can be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say, with jordan, you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all,ing in is a signal of interest which is i think important. here the private dimension has to focus as much as anything on syria. you have 400,000 syrian refugees in jordan today. 100 thon additional since the begin of this year. if the pac
to go down the u.n. road, the route of moving and international organizations, that is not road that will lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i did not mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria, but there will be private discussions on syria in israel. there'll be a private discussion with palestinians on israel as well. you have four hundred thousand palestinians in syria who are in a very vulnerable position. imagine that that is not currently part of a private conversation. sure, there'll be a focus on peace, but there will also be a focus on this. what are we doing to safeguard the palestinians that are there? goingordan, you're also to have a public and private pension. englander sends a signal of interest, which it is important, but the private pension has to focus on syria as well. you have four hundred thousand assyrian refugees in jordan today. 100,000 additional since the beginning of this year. if that pace continues, you could have 700,000 by june. the impact on jordan is actually very hard to cont
, we're on the highway. the israelis are ice rated. we went to the u.n. we'll go to the international criminal court. i feel they think there's no reason to compromise. i feel the open sesame is just to get the basics. if the president can get the palestinians and the israelis to talk about two states for two people it might sound like a cliche but i think it's the one thing that could have an impact on this because it deals with... does each side recognize that they are palestinian and jewish nationalists movements? the israelis are willing to do it but the palestinians are not. >> brown: we're going to focus tomorrow specifically on the palestinians. i'm wondering on the israeli side, is it fair to say that their real focus now as a security issue is much more on iran than on palestinian relations? >> iran i think in the exit polls only rated 10% of the people said that it was the top priority in the israeli election. it really didn't play in the election campaign. i think it does remain a threat, an existential threat. as the president said it's a year away before they get the bomb
with him that says, you know if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, if you want to continue to go down the route of moving on the international organizations that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. you know i didn't mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria but there will certainly be a private discussion on syria and israel. there will be a private discussion with abu mazen on syria as well. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position and it's hard to imagine even if that is not much of a public dimension for the conversation it is hard to imagine that will not be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but there will also be a focus on this and what if anything we in the international community could be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say with jordan you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all just being there sends a signal of
. animals may have been exposed to something like chlorine but nothing in a weaponized form. >> the u.n. still going to investigate. a military official meanwhile telling cnn that the video you're seeing there of syrians in hospital was reviewed. it does not appear to those people that the symptoms or treatments matched the use of chemical weapons. the united nations still looking into this as well. >> onto france now. a judge has put nicholas sarkozy under formal investigation for breach of trust accused of taking advantage of lo real cosmetics. >> the judge summoned him to his office in bordeaux. we have a picture there of him actually leaving the courthouse. he's in the back of the car. sarkozy denies taking or asking for any illegal campaign funding from her. >>> the pope is making news for canceling his newspaper subscription. something a lot of people can identify with, but he's the pope. >> yeah, he is. apparently what he did is he personally called the owner of a newspaper kiosk and said stop the subscription. at first the kiosk owner thought it was a joke, but then he realized
, decision to invade kuwait then the u.n. sanctions that follow that in the effect it had on iraqi society made it all the more difficult for that society to move toward stability in the wake of the saddam hussein regime. i would blame al qaeda and iraq and those who used masss murder as a principal tactic in the war. i would ask dr. zbigniew brzezinski to visit the cities in iraq that were rocked by these murderous attacks and ask them who they blame. who blame the people committed those murders. in 2005 when we went to a city where life was choked out of it because of a systematic attack by al qaeda, they turned that city into their training base. it is with a connected sniper training, medical training. insurgencies just that happened because people to not like america. these are organizations that mobilize resources and people. this is an enemy organization. courses offer their included kidnapping and murder. they choked the life out of the city. schools have been closed for over a year. marketplaces have a cold. -- been closed. communities have fallen in on themselves -- marketplaces
costly war between 1980 and 1988 with the iranians. a regime that had invaded kuwait after which u.n. sanctions really put an additional strain on iraqi society while at the same time strengthening the criminalize patronage networks associated with so there really control the country and the police state there. the associated polarizing effect on the community's poorer but they have become pitted against each other. how the regime had used weapons of mass destruction of his own people, the kurds in the north and how he persecuted the majority of the population, the shia population in the wake of the 91-92 gulf war. and also other factors associated with his return tough trade initiatives and the use of really appear 11 ideology to turn people's frustrations away from the regime in toward the west and israel and so forth. the context of the crusader conspiracy. in fact the fact that had on the iraqi society. so understanding that the human dimension and in particular understanding global conflict that could occur, how these trouble ethnic sectarian competition for power resources woul
asked the u.n. to look into the claim. >> the demand came after both sides accused each other of firing chemical weapons on tuesday. opposition groups insist rebels don't have access to such material. >> and u.s. officials saying they welcome the move. >>> first up, north korea's new and threatening message. pyongyang warning today it has the capability to strike u.s. bases in guam and japan. >> matthew chance joining us now from seoul, south korea. matthew, is this north korea's typical bluster or something more ominous here? >> it's really difficult to say, fredricka, because it's such an unpredictable regime. but what we do know is these threats are being made all the time now. there's a lot of tension that's been growing on the korean peninsula, tension that is being fueled by the statement that are increasingly coming out of pyongyang. barely a day can pass it seems without another north korean threat. state television is full of them. the latest in response to u.s. bomber flights over south korea. it's an annual military exercise but pyongyang is seething. >> translator: the u.s.
the two-year civil war in syria. but the commander says a resolution from the u.n. security council and agreement among nato's 28 members will be required before taking a military role in syria. the commander tells us the senate committee that he believes providing military assistance to the opposition would be helpful in bringing an end to the war. syria's main opposition group is demanding a full investigation into an alleged chemical weapons attack by president assad's forces. >>> happening right now, president obama is on his first visit to israel since taking office. this is a live picture out of jerusalem where president obama is visiting israeli president, shimon peres at hiss residence. the two men -- at his residence. the two men just stepped indoors. as kyla campbell reports from our washington, d.c. bureau, the president is taking part in some intense talks with israeli leaders today. >> reporter: president obama and israeli leaders have to come up with an agreement on how to respond to iran's nuclear threats. we're gonna look at the president arriving to shimon peres's h
: you said that the u.n. has weighed in. >> the high commissioner for human rights has a special envoy which concluded that it violates international standards of human rights. each the u.n. doesn't get t. germany doesn't get it, the obama administration doesn't get t. i am hope that this sixth circuit will get it right. >> shannon: please, keep us updated. >> i will. thank you very much. >> shannon: who can fob get the tragedy story about the sinkhole that swallowed a man sleeping in his bedroom. there is another sinkhole a mile away that has florida residents on edge. still to come... fair and balanced and a feisty debate about whether the union workers in michigan have a right to be mad. hey, our salads. [ bop ] [ bop ] [ bop ] you can do that all you want, i don't like v8 juice. [ male announcer ] how about v8 v-fusion. a full serving of vegetables, a full serving of fruit. but what you taste is the fruit. so even you... could've had a v8. [ construction sounds ] ♪ [ watch ticking ] [ engine revs ] come in. ♪ got the coffee. that was fast. we're outta here. ♪ [ engine revs ]
action to end the two-year civil war in syria. but the commander says a resolution from the u.n. security council and agreement among nato's 28 members will be required before taking a military role in syria. the commander tells us the senate committee that he believes providing military assistance to the opposition would be helpful in bringing an end to the war. syria's main opposition group is demanding a full investigation into an alleged chemical weapons attack by president assad's forces. >>> happening right now, president obama is on his first visit to israel since taking office. this is a live picture out of jerusalem where president obama is visiting israeli president, shimon peres at hiss residence. the two men -- at his residence. the two men just stepped indoors. as kyla campbell reports from our washington, d.c. bureau, the president is taking part in some intense talks with israeli leaders today. >> reporter: president obama and israeli leaders have to come up with an agreement on how to respond to iran's nuclear threats. we're
quiet. where we started tonight. and former u.n. ambassador to the united nations john bolton joins us with his take. plus, a major break in the case of an american tourist murdered abroad. turkish police believe they've turkish police believe they've nabbed the man who k k k what's droid-smart ? with google now, it automatically knows when you need to leave for the airport, how much traffic there is, and can have your boarding pass ready. the droid razr maxx hd by motorola. droid-smart. droid-powerful. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. the longest 4g lte battery in a razr thin profile. with 32 hours of battery life that turns an all-nighter, into a two-nighter. the droid razr maxx hd by motorola. droid-endurance. droid-powerful. you're o♪ ♪meout leo! some things won't last 25 years. ah! woof. some
and humanitarian missions since the u.n. was founded. of the well aware troubles in ireland over a 30- year time and how painful that was and how it affected life on our island brutally, tragically, and involved an enormous scale of response from some many people. many people. the hatred and loss was written over our timely -- tiny island. democracy and the region and the pursuit of democratic ideals, they were part of peace. the united states and america played its part in that area -- in that. america, in its pursuit of democracy, united us in so many ways. thatall being in this city in 1996 when the clinton administration called meetings from a business and political point of view. i remember senator george mitchell speaking about democracy. i remember him recalling his own family's involvement because of immigration from ireland in economic circumstances, that this country gave him the democratic opportunity to serve as senate leader for 20 years. he was followed at that meeting by ron brown, who tragically lost his life in a plane crash sometime later. george about democracy, mitchell point
access. reporter: unfetters access. a key phrase, we know too well how the security force have treated u.n. personnel on the ground it's a difficult question whether they will get that necessary unfettered access. >> shepard: are you concerned with the war spreading with fighting close to golan heights? >> the golan heights has been a bone of convention and now we're hearing reports of fighting close to what israel considers its border on the golan heights, that disputed territory. that's significant as well because as far as we are aware, from all the intelligence report wes have seen, the syrian rebels fighting in that area are less committed to the democratic government and the overthrow of president assad and more likely they're members of some of she islamic extremist groups who are fighting in syria. that, of course, is of great concern to israel when it's so close to their territory. >> shepard: jonathan hunt, thank you very much. put yourself in their shoes. those words from president obama to the israelis, talking about the treatment of palestinians who live in the west bank. on d
know that the u.n. is moving forward on investigation of exactly what happened. we're monitoring the situation ourselves. i have said publicly that the use of chemical weapons by the assad regime would be a game changer from our perspective because once you let that situation spin out of control, it's very hard to stop and can have enormous spillover effects across the region. >> gregg: the general is retired four-star general and fox news military analyst. pleasure to see you. thanks so much. you know, the rebels to overthrow assad desperately need weapons but they need intel. they have to know where the troop movements are. are they getting it in some way? >> they are finally starting to get it from us. i am delighted to see the increased support for the rebels. they are providing intelligence to them. they are downloading from satellite imagery and listening to what the syrian military is doing on the ground. we have enormous eavesdropping capability and we have human intelligence in terms of what is taking place. now that is bees funneled into some of the rebels, not all of t
look at the reform, you will want singapore's ambassador of the u.n. you tried to get india on china vetoes and you tried to take nigeria, the south africans get upset or vice versa. it's never going to happen. >> but you're absolutely right. and that's precisely the problem that for every japan, there's a south kor that says no. all the losers, the mexicos, the pakistans, the south koreas, others actually become winners and they get automatic seat in the security council at every fourth turn. now, that's a remarkable improvement for countries that have to spend millions of dollars to try to get re-elected back to the security council every four years. now, i'm saying, you have a seat. so, it's a win, win, win for the small states, the middle powers and the great powers. that's why i think eventually, not right away, the 777 formula can break the current lock on security council reform. >> great thing about this book, a lot of insight at 30,000 feet and also insight at the ground level because you live through these processes. pleasure to have you on. >> my pleasure. thank you for ha
listened to the u.n. weapons specialists. war is great for selling newspapers, you'll always see a retired general on the air as opposed to a howard zene. was there any mainstream immediate he i can't outlet that you think handled the run up to the war in a respectable manner? >> what's often cited rightly was the knight ridder bureau, whose reporters did not rely on the usual sources unnamed in tells sources. they went out and dug around, so actually were much closer to the truth on what happened. sometimes you had to go to sources in england and europe. there were hundreds of thousands of people in the streets. there also were, you know, a lot of people who editor ally urged caution. it was by no means, you know, a vast majority of people who were ready to go to war when we went to war and there were some media people who did well. i've covered this for 10 years you. mentioned my book, the book actually covers the whole 10 year period that talks about other mistakes the media made over time, not just at the beginning, and, you know, that's it -- as you know, the war did go on for quite a
resolution that gets voted on at the u.n. as we are flying back from the region, back to the u.s. on that trip that you, that we were discussing. we went to paris, we went to paris, egypt and then tunis. and it's in the course of those four days that that decision is made. so the conversation was very much, you know, the french are going to go ahead. we can let them do whatever they want, or we can actually try to shape this into something that is going to deliver people. >> host: i think my favorite chapter in the book is the trip to burma, perhaps because it's might be the most, i think, historical. >> guest: yes. i love that chapter. >> host: and just talk about what made that trip so unique. obviously, not very many people are traveling to burma at least from the united states at that time. >> guest: more and more, but certainly at the time it was very, very novel. you know, it was a very special moment, and it goes back to, um, when you look at the big picture of what, you know, my book will do for readers, this is a book that is several things. it is, you know, my persona
to protect civilians. that's the final resolution that gets voted on at the u.n., as we are flying back from the region, back to the u.s. on that trip that we were discussing, we went to paris. we went to paris, egypt and into this. it's in the course of those four days that that decision is made. so the conversation was very much, the french are going to go ahead. we can let them do whatever they want or we can try to shape us into something that is going to deliver. >> host: i think my favorite chapter in the book is the trip to burma, perhaps because it might be the most historical. >> guest: i love that chapter. >> host: just talk about what made that trip so unique. obvious that not very many people have gone to burma. >> guest: more and more of a string of the time it was very novel. you know, it was a very special moment, and it goes back to when you look at the big picture of what, no, my book will do for readers. is this is a book that is several things. it is, you know, my personal story, my perspective on american power. it is the story of hillary clinton as secretary of state and
quickly it will not be automobile to be detected by u.n. weapons inspectors and u.s. intelligence service that. is real concern that is the issue prime minister netanyahu and president obama have to agree. uma: on issue of syria, chemical weapons, what are the thoughts at this moment? is there viable evidence to say those weapons have actually been used? >> certainly those are the claims and i think there will be a u.n. investigation into this but that clearly has been a red line president obama has drawn and needs to draw and it will be very critical that if there are chemical weapons being used by the assad regime president obama responds accordingly. that is another red line he is drawing. that is red line irisraelies will be watching and iranians. is this president serious about committing to red lines and honoring the red lines. uma: quickly with obama speaking to young people in israel, that was very interesting strategy on his part because he knows he often does well in those kind of settings, at that type of theater backdrop. >> i think that's right. president obama shown in the u
eastern countries but in terms of world opinion. look at the vote in the u.n. when we made every single effort possible to discourage countries from voting in favor of palestinian membership in the u.n. how many votes out of 190, out of 190 did we get? we found only seven countries to support us. this tells us something. and, therefore, we have to be very, very clear inning on ourselves what are our interests, how do we promote them? and we make it clear to the israelis on decisions of war and peace that involve us, namely, particularly in regards to iran, we are the ones who make the decisions. >> senator coons, a fairly interesting appearing yesterday of two united states senators, john mccain and carl levin of michigan in urging the administration to consider tougher steps with regard to syria. and when you hear repeatedly the phrase about chemical weapons perhaps being used in syria, the shadow of iraq seems to come back to many people. weapons of mass destruction. what is your sense within the united states senate right now about that shadow that got us into iraq lurking over any p
are not seeing any of it the way the u.n. rules work. as long as the u.n. is recognizing the assad government that aid is not allowed to go into opposition territory which is where most of the refugees are so a whole calderon of issues. >> changing topics just a bit. some things only happen every four years, presidential elections and olympics and leap years. this weekend the senate did something it hadn't done in more than 1,400 days. they actually passed a budget. the all-night session stretched from thursday night to saturday. keystone lpipeline. they did pass the budget although by a margin of just one vote. >> the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments. we have done 101. the average 35 amendments, we have done 70, twice as many. doing this has been herculean feat. >> i know everyone is exhausted and you may not feel it at the moment but this is one of the senate's finest days in recent years and i commend everyone who has participated in this extraordinary debate. >> not a single republican supported the plan. one of the finest days in the history of the senate. four democrat
the fear of god into the iranians. >> megyn: what does it mean for us? when netanyahu went before the u.n. and held up that bomb and drew a red line. what he's saying in this clip, we could reach the point of no return in iran, with its nuclear efforts by spring or summer of 2013. 2013, we're there, ralph, we're this. we're in the spring of 2013. so if we really have given him the green light and he does believe the point of no return is likely spring or summer of 2013, what does the horizon hold? >> well, nothing good. now, prime minister netanyahu was talking how it might take iran out to a year to develop a bomb. so the time line shall the goal postses are shifting on this one, but nonetheless i stick by my longstanding view that for israel to do it alone is a mistake. if this absolutely must be done, and i would regret it, but if it must be be done, it's better for the united states to hit iran, only we have the power not only smash the iranian nuclear program in itself, but to prevent iran's retaliation, to do that you have to take out air defense, intelligence, revolutionary guard.
. the u.s. did nothing. the u.n. did nothing. the mayor, the council and citizens of los angeles did that. and it looks very different. new york it's not the port. in new york it's also not transportation. compared to place like phoenix and san diego use car the way they do in the west. but here the bulk of carbon emissions come from buildings poorly insulated, old, darkrooms, tar room, attracting the sub. so here mayor bloomberg niche initiated a crucial round of trying to get better insulation in old buildings, better insulated new buildings more efficient air conditioning, heating with change the six from four, to two, maybe to alternative energy. paint the rooms white. again, by local municipal laws and cooperative action and private-public partnership. you can begin to actually make an sphwhaict is measurable in the course of a year. that states simply haven't and can't do. and then you find these cities coming together in the c40 in other global environmental intercity organizations exchanging best practicing and you find what new york and l.a. have done can be replicated in other p
the planes are delivering humanitarian aid but the u.n. wants them stop for inspections in iraq before they continue to syria, and some see this is part of an american failure to suspectfully confront iran. >> fundamentally this is not a syria problem. this is an iran problem. what has impeded the administration's policy for the last two years since the conflict in syria began is an unwillingness to take on iran. that's the source of the trouble. that's where the key support for the assad regime comes from. >> there is no immediate indicate iraq will crackdown on the iranian flights. >>heather: steve, thank you from washington, dc. >> syria's western-backed opposition is reportedly in disarray after the president resigned early today in a surprise announcement saying he was frustrated with the international community and the opposition body itself. analysts say the chaos threatens to undermine the group's bid to unite forces against president assad and could also hamper support from the united states and other countries. >>heather: despite death threats, former pakistani president is b
the consumer. >> reporter: dramatic reductions came not through carbon tax or u.n. mandate, private sector forces and technologies greens oppose. >> process of fracking natural gas creates a significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions. >> reporter: so they oppose high i can fracturing because the more natural gas, lower the price. longer it would take before wind and solar replace fossil fuels and are cost competitive. back to you. heather: william la jeunesse, live for us, thank you. bill: the spring season pull ad houdini. where did it go? a a major snow storm is battling the midwest. that is look at white stuff throughout the country. tough going out there. it was supposed to be spring right? heather: old man winter has not given up. >> all i heard was we would have snow. i didn't hear how much we were getting. this is quite a lot. >> is this frustrating. this is march or spring. >> every year seems like it is like this. so just have to relax. bill: here we go on the 25th of march. snow records have been shattered, yet another spring storm burying parts of the country and taking its
reductions came not because of a carbon tax or a u.n. mandate but market forces and private sector technologies greens oppose. >> the process of fracking natural gas is, creates a significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions. >> reporter: greens also oppose fracking because it does mean more natural gas and lower prices. and that of course makes wind and solar more expensive, jon. you will continue to see the fight over fracking, about carbon taxes and subsidies for wind and solar. back to you. jon: william la jeunesse. good explanation there. thank you. jenna: your chances weren't that great of winning the fourth biggest jackpot in powerball history but somebody out there beat those 175 to 1 odds. how about that? now we're getting some word about where the winning ticket was sold. we'll have those breaking details for you up ahead. >>> the new health care law turns three years old over the weekend. what do we know about its true costs and requirements for everyday americans? we'll take a closer look ahead. [ male announcer ] every famous curve has an equally thrilling, lesser-kn
before the u.n. general assembly and saying, look, they've got all the parts and pieces they need to build weapons of mass destruction. how much more skeptical was the press supposed to be? >> well, you are setting up the bush administration's case for war in iraq. and the united states went to war in iraq. congress supported the president's policy on going to war, and the media supported it what this all adds up to, however, since it didn't work out that way, was that somebody got it drastically wrong. american intelligence got it wrong, the brits got it wrong, the israelis got it wrong, everybody did which means somebody in our society -- and it ends up being the media -- has to stand up and say let's think about this a little bit rather than rush into a war. we are now at a point, jon, where an american president can determine when the united states goes to war, whether the congress approves of it or not. we don't deal with deck la rightses -- declarations of war any longer. and so at this particular point, who other than the media ought to stand up and say, wait a minute, let'
involvement, there would have to be a u.n. security council resolution regional agreement and an agreement among the 28 patients. so within nato, what we are focused on is defending now with syria. and we would move patriot missiles down to do that. in terms of what else is happening in an individual nation by nation basis, there is a great deal of discussion of everything you mentioned, no-fly zones, arms embargoes, etc. it is moving individually, but it has not yet come into nato as an overall nato type of approach. it is focused, planning, being prepared. but the movement at the moment is in the individual national way. >> does that include some countries that are thinking about the possibility of going after at least some of serious air defense? >> yes. >> thank you. >> senator? >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> i want to get some clarification. i am disturbed about the answers that you just gave. i know that general jacoby, that would've been better asked. however, you are responsible for the homeland. when we talk about the capability of iran, we talk about both western europe and the
done solely for security reasons after a number of mortar shells reigned down the hotel housing u.n. staff. most employees are being temporarily relocated to buy route and cairo. the move comes as violence rages across the region. a top rebel was wounded and dozens of new deaths being reported just today. >>> it was a sour day on wall street with stocks closing lower amid worries a bailout deal struck in cyprus could set a precedent for other debt-strapped eurozone nations. the s&p, dow can jones and nasdaq all ended down. cyprus struck a deal with european negotiators earlier today, which means big losses at account holders at bankses. >>> it may be spring, but, oh, boy, many parts of the country, including right here in washington, are getting a heavy dose of winter. a powerful storm is packing in some cases historic amounts of snow and blustery winds across the midwest, mid-atlantic, and southern states. winter storm warnings were posted today from new jersey down to north carolina and tennessee, prompting hundreds of flight cancellations and delays. >>> and serious fireworks on
at the u.n. general assembly where we can never forget those images of prime minister netanyahu holding up a photograph of the bomb, and drawing that red line. also all of the discussion around him not being able to get that meeting with the president while he was in the united states now that he's got a warm welcome. let's let our viewers listen in a little bit more if we can to this. ♪ >> these are live pictures of a historic moment, president obama making his first visit to israel as president of the united states there. he is with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. a historic trip. it's also a very important trip as there are many items on the agenda, including the crisis in syria that's happening, and, you know, the chemical weapons, the suggestion of chemical weapons being used against the people in aleppo. it's apacked agenda for the president. our question was whether or not he would be addressing the situation in syria. >> it's been unclear whether or not the president was going to make official remarks here, right as he touched down or not. we know that he will view the iron do
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